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Sexual Self-Concept Questionnaire - Multidimensional (MSSCQ) « Sexual Attitudes « Surveys/Scales « Downloads

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Date postedJanuary 31, 2012
Downloaded969 times
CategoriesSexual Attitudes, Surveys/Scales, Perceived Vulnerability/Susceptibility, Personal Traits

Description

Scoring Instructions for the Multidimensional Sexual Self-Concept Questionnaire (MSSCQ). The Multidimensional Sexual Self-Concept Questionnaire (MSSCQ; Snell, 1995) is an objective self-report instrument designed to measure the following 20 psychological aspects of human sexuality:
(1) sexual-anxiety, defined as the tendency to feel tension, discomfort, and anxiety about the sexual aspects of one’s life (items 1, 21, 41, 61, 81);
(2) sexual self-efficacy, defined as the belief that one has the ability to deal effectively with the sexual aspects of oneself (items 2, 22, 42, 62, 82);
(3) sexual-consciousness, defined as the tendency to think and reflect about the nature of one’s own sexuality (3, 23, 43, 63, 83);
(4) motivation to avoid risky sex, defined as the motivation and desire to avoid unhealthy patterns of risky sexual behaviors (e.g., unprotected sexual behavior) (items 4, 24, 44, 64, 84;
(5) chance/luck sexual control, defined as the belief that the sexual aspects of one’s life are determined by chance and luck considerations (items 5, 25, 45, 65, 85); (6) sexual-preoccupation, defined as the tendency to think about sex to an excessive degree (items 6, 26, 46, 66, 86);
(7) sexual-assertiveness, defined as the tendency to be assertive about the sexual aspects of one’s life (items 7, 27, 47, 67, 87);
(8) sexual-optimism, defined as the expectation that the sexual aspects of one’s life will be positive and rewarding in the future (items 8, 28, 48, 68, 88);
(9) sexual problem self-blame, defined as the tendency to blame oneself when the sexual aspects of one’s life are unhealthy, negative, or undesirable in nature (items 9, 29, 49, 69, 89);
(10) sexual-monitoring, defined as the tendency to be aware of the public impression which one’s sexuality makes on others (items 10, 30, 50, 70, 90);
(11) sexual-motivation, defined as the motivation and desire to be involved in a sexual relationship (items 11, 31, 51, 71, 91);
(12) sexual problem management, defined as the tendency to believe that one has the capacity/skills to effectively manage and handle any sexual problems that one might develop or encounter (items 12, 32, 52, 72, 92);
(13) sexual-esteem, defined as a generalized tendency to positively evaluate one’s own capacity to engage in healthy sexual behaviors and to experience one’s sexuality in a satisfying and enjoyable way (items 13, 33, 53, 73, 93);
(14) sexual-satisfaction, defined as the tendency to be highly satisfied with the sexual aspects of one’s life (items 14, 34, 54, 74, 94);
(15) power-other sexual control, defined as the belief that the sexual aspects of one’s life are controlled by others who are more powerful and influential than oneself (items 15, 35, 55, 75, 95);
(16) sexual self-schemata, defined as a cognitive framework that organizes and guides the processing of information about the sexual-related aspects of oneself (items 16, 36, 56, 76, 96);
(17) fear-of-sex, defined as a fear of engaging in sexual relations with another individual (items 17, 37, 57, 77, 97);
(18) sexual problem prevention, defined as the belief that one has the ability to prevent oneself from developing any sexual problems or disorders (items 18, 38, 58, 78, 98);
(19) sexual-depression, defined as the experience of feelings of sadness, unhappiness, and depression regarding one’s sex life (items 19, 39, 59, 79, 99);
(20) internal-sexual-control, defined as the belief that the sexual aspects of one’s life are determined by one’s own personal control (items 20, 40, 60, 80, 100).

The Multidimensional Sexual Self-Concept Questionnaire consists of 100 items. After several items are reverse coded (items 27, 47, 68, 77, 88, and 97, designated with an “R”), the relevant items on each subscale are then coded so that A = 0; B = 1; C = 2; D = 3; and E = 4. Next, the items on each subscale are averaged, so that higher scores correspond to greater amounts of each tendency. Scores on the 20 subscales can thus range from 0 to 4. The items on the MSSCQ subscales alternate in ascending numerical order for each subscale (e.g., subscale 1 consists of items 1, 21, 41, 61, and 81; subscale 2 consists of items 2, 22, 42, 62, and 82)

.Developers:
William E. Snell, Jr., Ph. D.

Copyright:
Permission is granted to individuals to use the Multidimensional Sexual Self-Concept Questionnaire for research purposes. Permission granted by William E. Snell, Jr. on December 12, 1996.

References:
Snell, W. E., Jr. (1997). Measuring multiple aspects of the sexual self-concept: The Multidimensional Sexual Self-Concept Questionnaire (MSSCQ). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Snell, W. E., Jr. (1998). The Multidimensional Sexual Self-Concept Questionnaire. In C. M. Davis, W. L. Yarber, R. Baurerman, G. Schreer, and S. L. Davis (Eds.), Sexuality-related measures: A compendium (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Reliability:
The internal consistency of the 20 subscales on the MSSCQ was determined by calculating Cronbach alpha coefficients (Snell, 1995). Based on 5 items per subscale, the alphas for all subjects on the 20 subscales were: .84, .85, .78, .72, .88, .94, .84, .78, .84, .84, .89, .84, .88, .91, .85, .87, .85, .85, .85, and .76 (respectively). In brief, the 20 MSSCQ subscales have more than adequate internal consistency.